A Ghost Town Known as Urbanisation

In a contemporary world where “the new nobility… (a) child of its time, for which money (is) the power of all powers” (Marx, 2001 (1887)) we can see a rapid urbanisation taking hold of the vastly growing population of China. Where the “identity of national wealth and the poverty of the people” (Marx, 2001 (1887)) do not coincide with each other.  

According to a 2013 News Limited Network, “China is building new cities at an estimated rate of up to 12 to 24 per year… but while they are full of brand new homes and facilities, nobody wants to live there”.  Although real estate is in abundance, it is not uncommon for people to pay around $100,000 for a simple apartment, thereby making it unaffordable for the lower/working class of China. Its seems that, despite the “wealth of the nation” (Marx, 2001 (1887)) being well taken care of, the minimum wage earners are severely missing out on this dominated middle to upper class monopoly.

Where economic downturn is minimal due to the “estimated US $2 trillion spent to build the cities and keep the country’s economy going”, for many, according to David Harvey in his article ‘Rebel Cities: From the Right to the City to the Urban Revolution, “ideals of urban identity, citizenship and belonging are already threatened by the spreading of malaise of the individualistic, neoliberal ethic”, in other words, a domination of private, middle class ownership with only the scraps remaining for the lower and working class. 

Image

“The Chinese middle class is investing so much into middle class the government has enforced a one apartment rule” (Picture: 60 minutes/CBS)

 

References:

Marx, Karl 2001 (1887) Capital Vol.1 (The Electric Book Company) pp. 1024-1049.File
Harvey, David 2012 Rebel Cities: From the Right to the City to the Urban Revolution (Verso) pp. 3-25.URL
News Limited Network 2013 China builds mega cities but they remain empty ghost towns.URL

 

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